Aortic Stenosis Moderate and Regurgitation Mild - Rheumatic Origin

Description

This is an example of moderate aortic stenosis combined with mild aortic regurgitation in a patient with rheumatic heart disease.

The first heart sound is normal.

The second heart sound is unsplit.

There is an aortic ejection click in systole followed by a diamond-shaped systolic murmur. There is a high-pitched decrescendo murmur which fills the first two thirds of diastole.

Aortic stenosis (AS) is narrowing of the aortic valve, obstructing blood flow from the left ventricle to the ascending aorta during systole. Causes include a congenital bicuspid valve, idiopathic degenerative sclerosis with calcification, and rheumatic fever. Untreated AS progresses to become symptomatic with one or more of the classic triad of syncope, angina, and exertional dyspnea; heart failure and arrhythmias may develop. A crescendo-decrescendo ejection murmur is characteristic.

Aortic stenosis (AS) is narrowing of the aortic valve, obstructing blood flow from the left ventricle to the ascending aorta during systole. Causes include a congenital bicuspid valve, idiopathic degenerative sclerosis with calcification, and rheumatic fever. Untreated AS progresses to become symptomatic with one or more of the classic triad of syncope, angina, and exertional dyspnea; heart failure and arrhythmias may develop. A crescendo-decrescendo ejection murmur is characteristic. Diagnosis is by physical examination and echocardiography. Asymptomatic AS in adults usually requires no treatment. Once symptoms develop, surgical or percutaneous valve replacement is required. For severe or symptomatic AS in children, balloon valvotomy is effective.
Aortic Stenosis Moderate and Regurgitation Mild - Rheumatic Origin

Maneuver: Sitting leaning forward
Position: Aortic
Chestpiece: Diaphragm

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